By SAMAIRAH KHAN

The first lady of New York City showed her support for Governor Cuomo’s choice of lieutenant governor, Kathy Hochul, in a Brooklyn senior center on Tuesday.

“She’s a fighter, some really hard fighter. And that’s what we need in Albany,” said Mayor De Blasio’s wife Chirlane McCray.  “We need a partner. The whole de Blasio administration is behind her.”

The ringing endorsement by the de Blasios, renowned symbols of progressivism, came amid charges that Hochul, a moderate upstate Democrat, was too conservative for the Cuomo ticket and amid speculation that the governor might drop her from the ticket before the primary elections next Tuesday

McCray entered the game room with Hochul and Assemblyman Karim Camara. After shaking hands with people, roshe run suede femmes in her pink blazer and black skirt, Hochul playfully arm-wrestled with an old man.

The candidate seemed loose and ebullient. Dressed in a pink blazer and black skirt, she playfully arm-wrestled with an old man.

When McCray and Hochul went to the next room, the faces of the old people lit up upon seeing McCray.  One woman stroked McCray’s chin and said, “You’re so pretty.”

McCray told the audience that Hochul didn’t have a privileged childhood, that she used to work at a pizzeria, made chicken wings and waited at restaurants in order to make ends meet for her family

McCray also said that Hochul fought against the Tea Party, protecting Medicare and social security benefits. Further burnishing Hochul’s liberal credentials she cited he support of women’s equality, affordable housing, education and jobs.

“I just want to ask all of you, to give her your support, do the right thing,” said McCray, “’cause she’s doing the right thing by us.”

Hochul touted her desire to help people through public service: “My parents taught me values, they taught me that my responsibility as long as im on this Earth is to make lives better for other people…It’s real simple, you’ve been given a lot and you take care of other individuals.”

Hochul served one term in U.S. congress, representing a mostly Republican district upstate.